line

In mathematics, a conic section (or just conic) is a curve obtained by intersecting a cone (more precisely, a circular conical surface) with a plane.

In mathematics, a conic section (or just conic) is a curve obtained by intersecting a cone (more precisely, a circular conical surface) with a plane.

Note that this diagram is larger than I would usually recommend; it could be broken up into sub-diagrams. It does however tell quite a complete story, as a sort of UML poster.

These segments are called its edges or sides, and the points where two edges meet are the polygon's vertices or corners.

These segments are called its edges or sides, and the points where two edges meet are the polygon's vertices or corners.

Here one can navigate from a lower (nested) context back to it's higher parent context via an automatically generated InterfaceRealization. This approach works well when the source text is stable (i.e., the paragraph from which both the lower and higher context source sentences come is stable).

In geometry a polygon .. is traditionally a plane figure that is bounded by a closed path or circuit, composed of a finite sequence of straight line segments (i.e., by a closed polygonal chain)

In geometry a polygon .. is traditionally a plane figure that is bounded by a closed path or circuit, composed of a finite sequence of straight line segments (i.e., by a closed polygonal chain)

Logical wrapping contexts can be nested to reflect sentences (or phrases) from the same paragraph, providing convenient navigation points from a higher to lower contexts, however this technique should not be employed too often, as it leads to graphical clutter and can introduce undesired coupling.

Syndicate content