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point | Webel IT Australia "The Elements of the Web"

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In mathematics, a conic section (or just conic) is a curve obtained by intersecting a cone (more precisely, a circular conical surface) with a plane.

In mathematics, a conic section (or just conic) is a curve obtained by intersecting a cone (more precisely, a circular conical surface) with a plane.

Note that this diagram is larger than I would usually recommend; it could be broken up into sub-diagrams. It does however tell quite a complete story, as a sort of UML poster.

A circle is the locus of points from which the distance to the center is a given value, the radius.

A circle is the locus of points from which the distance to the center is a given value, the radius.

We'll need this shortly to compare Circle with Ellipse (which Apollonius considered to have a different geometrical locus than a Circle).

In mathematics, a locus (Latin for place, plural loci) is a collection of points which share a property

In mathematics, a locus (Latin for place, plural loci) is a collection of points which share a property

This diagram (and the focus sentence about 'loci') provides supporting information for the upcoming investigation of conic sections.

In this case I've chosen to include quite of lot of other «wrapper» Components for other logical contexts (if overused this practice undermines the sense of "focus" on one sentence at a time).

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