patch programming

Science zone

Dr Darren of Webel originally trained as a computational physicist and applied mathematician, performed research from 1988 to 1993 in radio astronomy and astrophysics, and worked as a scientific computing expert and particle accelerator physicist from 1993 to 1999, as well as working on numerous science and education projects after establishing the Webel IT Australia Scientific IT Consultancy in 2000. You can find out more about his science career at: Dr Darren Kelly's full-career Curriculum Vitae.

From Wikipedia: Computational Physics (Aug 2016):

Computational physics is the study and implementation of numerical analysis to solve problems in physics for which a quantitative theory already exists. Historically, computational physics was the first application of modern computers in science, and is now a subset of computational science.

It is sometimes regarded as a subdiscipline (or offshoot) of theoretical physics, but others consider it an intermediate branch between theoretical and experimental physics, a third way that supplements theory and experiment.


This zone features various (mostly archival and historical) science projects, many of which demonstrate applications of the model-based software engineering and systems engineering technologies promoted on this site and offered as Webel services.


HERA particle accelerator: electron Beam Loss Monitor lifetime disruption plots
Example of numerical integation and visualisation of a differential equation in the Maple symbolic algebra system
Maple 3d plot animation example
Maple example: symbolic algebra equation and numerical solution
HERA particle accelerator: custom data analysis application
CT scan slice: visualisation example: 1
CT scan slice: visualisation example: 2
MOST radiotelescope: Java3D animation: steering (9.8M)
Figure 2: A diagram of MOST with the numbering system used in this  thesis report (1988)
Figure 3: MOST radiotelescope: A diagram of the coordinate system used in the report (1988)
Figure 10: the MOST radiotelescope synthesised beam
Figure 1: MOST radiotelescope "skymap" from observation of a strong point source at field centre
Figure 11: Model: UML2 composite structure diagram of the monochromator assembly
Figure 09: Model: bunker shield assembly for the Platypus reflectometer as "wrapped block" class diagram.
Figure 10: Model: UML2 composite structure diagram for the monochromation beam stage of the neutron diffractometers of the OPAL NBIs.
Figure 12: Model: UML2 composite structure diagram of the monochromator stage assembly with motorised goniometer rotation, tilt, and translation stages, which are driven by encoded devices.
Figure 13: Model: wrapped block class diagram (software engineering view) for the entire monochromation beam ("logical") stage.


Contents of: Science zone

FilterCh.pd

FilterCh.pd

A mono filter chain with controls.

VFO.pd

VFO.pd

Each channel of each Drancel can drive a Variable Frequency Oscillator (VFO) - in this case a simple sine oscillator - with the option of locking onto discrete MIDI note frequencies, as well as a frequency scaling, a frequency offset, and an output gain.

Filters.pd

Filters.pd

Some of the very electronic noises generated can be a bit abrasive, especially from wide-sweeping VFOs, so it is useful to cut some very low rumble and some very high frequencies. This patch feeds stereo to some basic mono filters in FilterCh.pd.

VFOacc3D.pd

VFOacc3D.pd

Variable Frequency Oscillators (VFOs) are grouped in a triad corresponding to the (X,Y,Z) accelerometer channels of a Drancel.

This is the most immediately powerful Drancing mode as far as aural biofeedback is concerned, and it promotes proprioception. It sounds quite sci-fi like and eerie, and reminds one of the Theremin, except there are (in the mode shown here) 3 independent frequencies, which can be made "rub" together to create beat frequencies.

Global.pd

Global.pd

The globals are grouped for application across all Drancels, along with RESET (defaults on) and OFF (silent) globals (via message sends), and DSP controls.

WiiOSC.pd

WiiOSC.pd

The accelerometer signals (as well as the button signals, orientation, and position signals) from each WiiTM Remote, are obtained via on OSC dump on a network port (decoupled here as an inlet).

The accelerometer-centric Drancing system currently only uses the (X,Y,Z) acceleration signals, however I am working on exploiting the WiiTM Remote buttons to control various synthesis parameters and modes (they are all already recognised OK as flashing "bangs").

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