model-driven development

About Webel IT Australia

Webel - in operation in Australia since 2000 - is a Scientific IT Consultancy specialising in web application development, Content Management System (CMS) web sites, model-based software engineering and systems engineering using technologies such as:

Proprietor Dr Darren welcomes you to Webel IT Australia - the "Elements of the Web"

IT Training

Webel promotes graphical, model-based development and offers Advanced UML and SysML training seminars and workshops, and courses in model-based, UML-driven, Java software engineering and XML schema data engineering.

Dr Darren is recognised as a leader in graphical software and systems engineering technologies and worked as an expert consultant on MagicDraw UML and the MD SysML Plugin.


The Doctor is in the Webel IT Australia house and available for hire

Just phone +61 (2) 9386 0090 or email Webel consultant Dr Darren in Bondi, Sydney, Australia, to ask about Webel's services for UML™-driven graphical software engineering with Java™ and XML, expert domain and requirements modelling with UML™ Parsing Analysis, graphical systems engineering with SysML, and custom data analysis. Webel also offers PHP-driven Drupal™ Content Management System (CMS) web sites, as well as audio, video, and media services, and unique Pure Data real-time audio and video synthesis services. (That's Dr Darren left working from his Webel office day and night.)

Latest résumé versions

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Science zone

Dr Darren of Webel originally trained as a computational physicist and applied mathematician, performed research from 1988 to 1993 in radio astronomy and astrophysics, and worked as a scientific computing expert and particle accelerator physicist from 1993 to 1999, as well as working on numerous science and education projects after establishing the Webel IT Australia Scientific IT Consultancy in 2000. You can find out more about his science career at: Dr Darren Kelly's full-career Curriculum Vitae.

From Wikipedia: Computational Physics (Aug 2016):

Computational physics is the study and implementation of numerical analysis to solve problems in physics for which a quantitative theory already exists. Historically, computational physics was the first application of modern computers in science, and is now a subset of computational science.

It is sometimes regarded as a subdiscipline (or offshoot) of theoretical physics, but others consider it an intermediate branch between theoretical and experimental physics, a third way that supplements theory and experiment.


This zone features various (mostly archival and historical) science projects, many of which demonstrate applications of the model-based software engineering and systems engineering technologies promoted on this site and offered as Webel services.


HERA particle accelerator: electron Beam Loss Monitor lifetime disruption plots
Example of numerical integation and visualisation of a differential equation in the Maple symbolic algebra system
Maple 3d plot animation example
Maple example: symbolic algebra equation and numerical solution
HERA particle accelerator: custom data analysis application
CT scan slice: visualisation example: 1
CT scan slice: visualisation example: 2
MOST radiotelescope: Java3D animation: steering (9.8M)
Figure 2: A diagram of MOST with the numbering system used in this  thesis report (1988)
Figure 3: MOST radiotelescope: A diagram of the coordinate system used in the report (1988)
Figure 10: the MOST radiotelescope synthesised beam
Figure 1: MOST radiotelescope "skymap" from observation of a strong point source at field centre
Figure 11: Model: UML2 composite structure diagram of the monochromator assembly
Figure 09: Model: bunker shield assembly for the Platypus reflectometer as "wrapped block" class diagram.
Figure 10: Model: UML2 composite structure diagram for the monochromation beam stage of the neutron diffractometers of the OPAL NBIs.
Figure 12: Model: UML2 composite structure diagram of the monochromator stage assembly with motorised goniometer rotation, tilt, and translation stages, which are driven by encoded devices.
Figure 13: Model: wrapped block class diagram (software engineering view) for the entire monochromation beam ("logical") stage.


Contents of: Science zone

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