JavaBeans

A set of standard tags used in JSP and Facelets pages to refer to Java EE components

A set of standard tags used in JSP and Facelets pages to refer to Java EE components

This source text sentence and analysis until now leave a lot of questions open:

  • Is there some kind of "Java EE page" Artifact abstraction that would unify JSP and Facelet pages ?
  • How - if at all - do JavaBeans and the user interface components of JavaServer Faces relate to 'Java EE components' ?
  • Are the Expression Language tags defined in the JavaServer Pages Standard Tag Library ?
  • 'Facelet applications .. use XHTML pages'

These might become clearer when executable examples from the First Cup tutorial are examined and related to this analysis.

Facelets applications are a type of JavaServer Faces applications that use XHTML pages rather than JSP pages.

Facelets applications are a type of JavaServer Faces applications that use XHTML pages rather than JSP pages.

It seems reasonably clear now that:

  • All JavaEE applications are (at least) web applications.
  • JSF applications are J2EE applications that use 'JSP pages' (although it is not clear what kind of JSP pages)
  • 'Facelet applications .. use XHTML pages'

Something is still a bit suspicious; why isn't there a nice "ladder" between the application types and the page artifacts ? More information is needed.

A user-interface component framework for web applications that allows you to include UI components (such as fields and buttons) on a page, convert and validate UI component data, save UI component data to server-side data stores, and maintain component st

A user-interface component framework for web applications that allows you to include UI components (such as fields and buttons) on a page, convert and validate UI component data, save UI component data to server-side data stores, and maintain component st

The source text sentence is nearly as long as a Thomas Mann novel:

A user-interface component framework for web applications that allows you to include UI components (such as fields and buttons) on a page, convert and validate UI component data, save UI component data to server-side data stores, and maintain component state.

"Divide and Conquer" is our very good friend.

It's not clear (yet) whether a JavaEE application is a kind of 'web application', or whether a 'web application' is a part of a Java EE application.

Is it possible that a *JavaBean acts as a datastore to which 'UI component data' is saved ? And is saving the same as storing (permanently) ?

Also,it may be that the first attempt at a *Datastore model was naive, assuming that it only stores application data. Is 'UI component data' a special kind of application data, or should there perhaps be a more general *Data that both extend ?

Finally, since there are no candidate Classes mentioned that could 'convert', 'validate', or 'maintain component state', for the sake of analysis the *JavaServerFaces technology provides these services as interfaces.

Objects that act as temporary data stores for the pages of an application

Objects that act as temporary data stores for the pages of an application

The datastore concept is reused in the analysis with a stereotyped Generalization.

An explicit analysis *Object Class is introduced, which could later be related to the java.lang.Object.

[Java Web Services Development Pack (JWSDP)]

The content or the technology discussed here is HISTORICAL or ARCHIVAL
The content or the methodology here is OBSOLETE !

Has been replaced by GlassFish.

Java EE

Java Platform, Enterprise Edition.

For more information about use of this technology by Webel please visit the Java EE zone.
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