The container manages the component's lifecycle, dispatches requests to application components, and provides interfaces to context data, such as information about the current request.

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The container manages the component's lifecycle, dispatches requests to application components, and provides interfaces to context data, such as information about the current request.

This source text from Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform is subtle. Let's break it down piece-by-piece for treatment by UML™ Parsing Analysis.

'The container' is taken to be the web container, clear from the context.

The snippet 'manages the component's lifecycle', is taken to refer to a web component as explored in the analysis of:

A web component can be a servlet, a JavaServer Faces Facelets page, or a JSP page.

It is granted a distinct named Association from *Container_web to *Component_web, as well as an Association to a statemachine for *Component_web (taken to represent the states of the lifecycle), and - just for comparison - also to a separate *Lifecycle Class, which in the analysis represents those aspects of the lifecycle that can't be encapsulated by states.

The snippet 'dispatches requests to application components', begs the questions: What kind of requests are meant ? And what exactly are 'application components' ?

The snippet 'and provides interfaces to context data, such as information about the current request' is modelled using a UML Interface provided (under the strictly port-based form of UML™ Parsing Analysis) via a Port, the multiplicity of which is shown using an "element property callout" into a UML Note.

Is the 'current request' the request sent by a remote client ?

randomness